The Many Processes of Micro Threading

Micro threads are defined as having a pitch of 80 or more threads per inch, according to the article. Six different processes can be used to produce micro threads, including tapping, conventional turning, thread chasing, thread rolling, grinding and electrochemical grinding.


When you put your eyeglasses on this morning, did you think about the micro threads required to put those together? While reaching for your cell phone, did you ever ponder how it was assembled and that micro threads are integral to this process? Maybe you did since you work in manufacturing, but like most people, I don’t think about it until I read articles like “Making Micro Threads.” But even after reading about it, it’s not something I’m continually cognizant of, which is why I find it so interesting every time I’m reminded of these tiny parts that are machined by some of Production Machining’s readers.

Micro threads are defined as having a pitch of 80 or more threads per inch, according to the article. Six different processes can be used to produce micro threads, including tapping, conventional turning, thread chasing, thread rolling, grinding and electrochemical grinding. Thread chasing and thread rolling are performed on lathes, with tools other than a conventional v-groove tool.

For more information about micro threads and which tools are most suitable for certain applications, read “Making Micro Threads.”