This Cold-Hearted Process Deserves a Chance

Cryogenic users say this process works, even when the rest of us question why it works. It involves transmitting liquid nitrogen at -300 to -321°F through the spindle/turret and tool body directly to the cutting tool.


Now that winter has arrived and many of us feel it’s chilly effects, it’s time to start talking cold tools--I’m referring to “cryogenic” tools. Cryogenic users say this process works, even when the rest of us question why it works. It involves transmitting liquid nitrogen at -300 to -321°F through the spindle/turret and tool body directly to the cutting tool.

According to “Cryogenic Treatment and Cutting Tool Life,” widespread acceptance of this process has been relatively slow, not only because deep freezing tools for longer life seems unbelievable, but there is a perceived lack of scientific data to document what’s actually happening. Treated tools also show no cosmetic change after cryogenic treatment, which puts the process in question until customers see the increase in tool life for themselves.

With benefits such as environmentally friendliness, increased tool life, decreased tool wear and energy costs, higher cutting speeds and the ability to work with hard to machine materials, the cryogenic process deserves a chance to be successful, perhaps in one of your shop’s applications.

To learn more about the process, visit “A New Source for Cryogenic Tooling,” as well as “Video: A Resource for Cryogenic Machining.”