Additive Manufacturing is Not 3D Printing

AM has already surpassed its foundational technology of 3D printing. Chris Koepfer recommends subscribing to Additive Manufacturing magazine and visiting its companion website to keep up with this rapidly changing technology.

a row of powder-bed machines for additive manufacturing

Tangible Solutions installed this row of powder-bed machines as part of a process being prepared for full-scale production via additive manufacturing. Read the story here.

According to our sister publication, Additive Manufacturing (AM), it’s time to recognize that AM is a stand-alone process that includes 3D printing. Pete Zelinski, editor-in-chief, in his August column, explains it this way, “3D printing is at the heart of AM just like turning might be the key operation in a subtractive machining process. As process facilitators, each core technology leads to a positive result—good parts.”

The interest in AM is more universal than any technology I can remember coming along in decades, and maybe of all time. This technology has captured the imagination of manufacturers and non-manufacturers. Our mass media seems to be enamored with AM’s potential, as is the discrete parts manufacturing industry.

On most shop visits I make these days, AM is invariably mentioned in the interview. There is a wide ranging curiosity about the process, specifically how it might be an augment to a traditional subtractive machining operation. These shops seem intent on not being left behind as AM moves forward.

To that end, I recommend that you consider Additive Manufacturing magazine and its companion website to keep up with this rapidly changing technology. AM has already surpassed its foundational technology of 3D printing as Mr. Zelinski discusses in his column. Most believe there is more to come. Read the entire article here