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Ask these questions as an exercise to identify what information your site needs to grow closer toward what really is needed by researchers, specifiers and buyers researching you via the Web.

Ask these questions as an exercise to identify what information your site needs to grow closer toward what really is needed by researchers, specifiers and buyers researching you via the Web:

“What projects have you done similar to mine?” Describe similar projects you’ve done that are industry-, material- or process-specific and that relate more directly to a prospect’s project.

“What do you do for similar customers, beyond the specs of the part?” Explain the ancillary support you provide your customers (finishing, shipping, quality, file transfer, project support and so on).

“How have you expanded your capabilities/technologies for past projects?” Portray your shop’s growth, not just in terms of time, but also its process growth. Longevity is important, but so is your agility and ability to grasp and implement new technologies.

“How have you overcome challenges to provide better service?” If you’re in this business of manufacturing, then you’ve had to deal with a calamity or two. Give details about what happened, what processes were applied, what type of customer/industry it was for, and how you saved the day.

“How have you improved your processes and capabilities, maybe even mid-project?” Like the previous question, explain how you may have suggested and adopted new technologies or processes outside the original scope of a project that translated into real value for a customer. Don’t forget to define the characteristics of those solutions as they relate to what industry a prospect is from, and the specific process changes that made the parts better or cheaper.

Go beyond the part specifications. Go beyond the machinery you own. Get to the heart of what differentiates you from your competitors, and explain it as though you are speaking to someone on the phone for the second time.