5/26/2015 | 1 MINUTE READ

Classifying Burrs Makes Choosing Deburring Options Easier

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When everyone has a different opinion about a definition of a problem, it is hard to provide solutions.

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When everyone has a different opinion about a definition of a problem, it is hard to provide solutions. So when a team of manufacturers addressed the fact that every manufacturer defined a burr differently, they sat down and developed five standard burr classes. This standard was quickly adopted by manufacturing companies and embraced by distribution channels.

Burrs can form on all types of materials, including steel, aluminum, ductile iron and titanium. Class 1 burrs are known as “micro burrs” and can only be seen with magnification. Class 2 burrs are also small burrs, sometimes called “feather burrs,” but can be seen with the naked eye. Class 3 burrs are well attached burrs that are small in nature. Class 4 are well attached burrs that are large in nature. Class 5 burrs are commonly known as “extruded burrs” and are not actually burrs, but rather a deformation of extruded material caused by drilling.

Burrs on steel and aluminum typically are classified as Class 1 or 2 and can be removed with standard silicon carbide advanced technology brushes.

Class 3 and 4 burrs require a more aggressive deburring product, such as short-trim wheel brushes. These burrs require finishing products that can stand up to the job and help shorten cycle times as well.

To learn more about the five classes of burrs and how to satisfy your customers’ deburring needs, visit “A Standard Approach to Classifying Burrs.” 

 

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