5/19/2011 | 1 MINUTE READ

Form Tools Cost Effective for Some Applications

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

 Many machining applications require custom solutions.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

 Many machining applications require custom solutions. Form tools, which are custom inserts, are often a special order choice among machine shops because of the advantages they offer—cycle time, accuracy and finish—which overall are a cost-effective pick for machining a complex cylindrical profile.

The advantages of form tooling are made obvious in this video comparing single-point turning and machining with a form tool. The time benefit is especially highlighted: The in-out stroke of the form tool allows the profile to be machined in about one-third of the time.

This type of tooling is also more accurate than standard tooling because a turning tool involves two machine axes where a form tool uses only one machine axis. Fewer moving elements contribute to less error, which can make achieving tight tolerances easier.

Another benefit to using form tools is finish. With a single-point tool, inevitably there are cusps between rotations of the workpiece as the cutting edge travels along the contour. A form tool omits these cusps, because the entire segment of the part represented by the form is machined in a single plunge.

To read further about form tools and the additional advantage of tool life, read “Form Tools on CNC Lathes.”

As always, if there’s a topic you would like to see covered here, or if you have any comments about past columns, please email me. 

RELATED CONTENT

  • Precision Lathe Operations on a CNC Mill

    Sometimes a shop doesn’t do enough turning work to justify the purchase of a CNC lathe. But when it needs to produce precision turned parts, even if for a very small lot size, the shop needs a solution.

  • Broaching On A Lathe

    Producing a keyway, spline or similar longitudinal feature on a turned part usually necessitates an additional, time-consuming, secondary operation on a broaching or slotting machine. That means moving the part to and from a secondary operation, an extra setup, additional labor and hourly machine costs and all of the other headaches that go with secondary operations.

  • Cutting Tool Coating Production

    This article looks at the coating methods available for carbide cutting tools.


Resources