9/10/2018

Hardinge Wants You to Rethink Normal

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New ownership has shops rethinking normal for a new approach to getting the job done. Two booths are showcasing metalcutting and workholding products.

IMTS 2018 Exhibitors

Hardinge

South, Level 3, Booth 338738

View Showroom | Register Here

Forkardt

West, Level 3 & Annex, Booth 431314

View Showroom | Register Here

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Forkardt and Hardinge will be exhibiting new technology at IMTS 2020 in Chicago this September.

Get registered here!

Earlier this year, Hardinge announced the company’s acquisition by private investment firm Privet Fund Management LLC. The theme introduced by the new ownership is “Rethink Normal,” with a new approach to getting the job done. Three members of the company’s executive team are in the booth this week sharing their ideals and generating discussions about how Hardinge plans to evolve the way shops do business.

The company has two booths at the show. In the South Building, the Hardinge booth focuses on metal cutting, with 10 machines running, including the new Talent GT gang-tool lathe and Kellenberger 100 cylindrical grinder. The company’s workholding products are displayed in the Forkardt booth in the West Building, which also features a Bridgeport V480 APC vertical machining center with Forkardt rotary table.

Stop by both booths to see the products in action.

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