3/4/2009

Turn-Mill Center Features Three Y-Axis Turrets

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The company’s B765Y3 has more than 4" of Y-axis travel on all three turrets. Combined with the company’s standard tooling, customers can load as many as 144 cutting tools, allowing them to either machine several different parts without any change-over time or load several redundant cutting tools (using the company’s tool load software to detect tool wear and run “lights out”). The machine has 2.

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The company’s B765Y3 has more than 4" of Y-axis travel on all three turrets. Combined with the company’s standard tooling, customers can load as many as 144 cutting tools, allowing them to either machine several different parts without any change-over time or load several redundant cutting tools (using the company’s tool load software to detect tool wear and run “lights out”).

The machine has 2.56 bar capacity with 35 hp on the main spindle and 20 hp on the subspindle. C axis on both spindles and four axis on each turret are standard with live tools at every turret station (as many as 27 live tools).

According to the company, the machine can quickly be changed from bar work to chucking work. Both the main and subspindle can be equipped with 8" chucks, which are designed to work with the company’s custom software for robotic or mechanical loading.

The series is also offered in a small size, 1.77 bar capacity and a larger size, 3.15 bar capacity.

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