PM Blog

By: Bart Bishop 9. November 2017

Business Owners Need to Adapt to Millennials

Business Owners Need to Adapt to Millennials

The future for millennials in the workplace will be centered on communication, transparency, openness, technology and results created versus hours at the office. This is because this generation, composed of employees age 18 to 34, have different expectations of their employers. They’ve been raised in a digital age of the internet and social media, and this has brought expectations of transparency, feedback and ever-updated technology.

PM contributor Todd Palmer examines what this means for business owners in his “About Your Business” column. Businesses will have to evolve with the times as managers that have grown up with email and texting move into position, with smart phones replacing desk phones within a decade. This will all be to facilitate a workforce that, along with money, flexibility, sharing of ideas, progression in life, not necessarily taking a management position and having fun also wants to be appreciated in an environment in which they can make an impact.

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View PM’s November 2017 Digital Edition

Production Machining’s November Digital Edition is now available. This issue features an emphasis topic of Milling/Machining Centers, for which we look at strategies for and advantages of adding 4th- and 5th-axis capabilities to a 3-axis machining center. We also offer Special Coverage of Defense/Military with a cool story about a shop in Florida that is focused strictly on production of firearms/weaponry components.

For our last Parts Cleaning emphasis of the year, we review three industry cleaning protocol standards and how these requirements play together with customer-specific standards.

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By: Bart Bishop 7. November 2017

Tour of Sunnen Emphasizes the Importance of Honing

On the same trip that took us to Hyodromat’s Oktoberfest event, with Production Machining’s Editor-in-Chief Chris Koepfer I took a tour of Sunnen Products Company’s headquarters the morning of Oct. 24. 

Honing is a combination of machine, tool, abrasive, coolant and gaging, as these are all crucial to production. Honing is, of course, an abrasive machining process that produces a precision surface on a metal workpiece by scrubbing an abrasive stone against it along a controlled path. This is primarily used to improve the geometric form and the surface texture. In Sunnen’s case their focus is on hydraulics, energy production, aviation, automotive, and even musical instruments such as trumpet parts.

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Most precision turning machine shops also use vertical machining centers. These two fundamental metalworking processes, turning and milling, are by far the most often performed.

For shops that use the two operations sequentially as in turning the part, then performing secondary operations on the machining center, balancing the work flow between the two processes can be a challenge. Turning is usually the faster operation of the two, causing a potential buildup of work in process ahead of the machining center.

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Upon stepping foot on Paul Horn GmbH’s factory floor for the first time, I knew it was a special company. I could see my reflection in the shiny, white finish, and I am pretty sure that I uttered aloud, “Wow, I could eat strudel off the floors in here!”

Horn’s facility in Tübingen, Germany, is impressive not only because of its cleanliness, but the size of the campus and the company’s fast growth from year to year. Over the past two years, Horn doubled its production floor with an investment of 70 million Euros. Horn has 75 milling centers, turning machines and other machinery for in-house production of all its toolholders and additional equipment.  

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