9/11/2014 | 1 MINUTE READ

Discussing Manufacturing’s Future

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Earlier in the week, Kennametal presented in its booth (W-1522) an industry panel discussion about the future of manufacturing. Leading the presentation was Jim Carroll, author, who introduced the other panel members and initiated discussions about the importance of staying current on the latest industry trends and applications to keep pace with the accelerating movement of integrated digital manufacturing.

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A panel of industry experts in the Kennametal booth encouraged attendees to reimagine the future of digital manufacturing.

Earlier in the week, Kennametal presented in its booth (W-1522) an industry panel discussion about the future of manufacturing. Leading the presentation was Jim Carroll, author, who introduced the other panel members and initiated discussions about the importance of staying current on the latest industry trends and applications to keep pace with the accelerating movement of integrated digital manufacturing.

Other panel members included Dan Frayssinet, president of DP Technology, Alexander Zoller, president of Zoller, Andreas Haimer, president of the Haimer Group, John Reed, marketing manager of CGTech, and Pete Dragich, vice president, integrated supply and logistics, Kennametal. The group touched on some very significant points regarding the Internet’s effect on global manufacturing and the ability to facilitate the sharing of data. Most importantly, shops need to continue to work smarter and faster as products reach obsolescence much more quickly than before. Although the often noted skills crisis is reason for concern, the increasing use of digital manufacturing seems to be the key to reinventing the industry in such a way to spark more interest among young people.

Finally, the panel encouraged attendees to think hard about their future. Companies need a solid understanding of the direction they’re heading in the next two years and the next five years. Such planning can help in a step by step approach to growth, as these increments are more manageable. In 10 years, however, the world of manufacturing will be completely different, and it’s near impossible to predict what the requirements will be at that time.


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