2/14/2014

Done Deal

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After a long ramp up, CAD software giant Autodesk announced on February 6 that it has completed acquisition of CAM software leader Delcam.

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Carl Bass, president and CEO of Autodesk (center) with (left to right) Glenn McMinn, president, Delcam North America; Clive Martell, chief executive, Delcam; Steve Hobbs, development director, Delcam; and Bart Simpson, commercial director, Delcam.

 

After a long ramp up, CAD software manufacturer, Autodesk, announced February 6 that it has completed acquisition of CAM software leader, Delcam. This deal has been in the works for several months.

Autodesk serves customers in the manufacturing, architecture, building, construction, and media and entertainment industries. “The acquisition of Delcam is an important step in Autodesk’s continued expansion into manufacturing and fabrication and beyond our roots in design,” says Buzz Kross, senior V.P. for design, lifestyle and simulation products at Autodesk.

Delcam, through its CAM product brands, including Featurecam, Partmaker and Powermill, are familiar to the metalworking industry and widely applied in a variety of precision machined parts shops. The addition of a CAD component such as Autodesk will enhance automation of the design and programming functionality of these shops. 

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