11/24/2018

November 2018 Product Spotlight: Cleaning and Deburring

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This month’s Modern Equipment Review Spotlight focuses on equipment used to finish parts by removing burrs, oils and other contaminants.

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The image gallery above, based on Modern Machine Shop magazine’s Modern Equipment Review Spotlight, features a variety of finishing equipment for deburring and cleaning finished parts. Several of these technologies were displayed at IMTS 2018 in September. Swipe through the gallery for details, and follow the caption links for more information about each item.

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We’d rather send you $15 than rely on our crystal ball…

It’s Capital Spending Survey season and the manufacturing industry is counting on you to participate! Odds are that you received our 5-minute Metalworking survey from Production Machining in your mail or email. Fill it out and we’ll email you $15 to exchange for your choice of gift card or charitable donation. Are you in the U.S. and not sure you received the survey? Contact us to access it.

Help us inform the industry and everybody benefits.

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    New tools increase the efficiency of automatic hole deburring. Some can handle holes as small as 0.030 inch diameter.

  • Getting More Bang For Your Deburring Buck

    Today, customers demand parts that are burr-free, which would suggest aggressive deburring. At the same time, they want parts that are free of scratches and dings, which calls for gentle processing. There is a non-conventional deburring process that not only completely removes burrs from even difficult-to-reach part areas, but also leaves machined features and surface finishes intact and parts free of nicks and scratches. The process is called thermal deburring.

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