Turn/Mill Machines | 1 MINUTE READ

See Absolute, Marubeni Citizen’s PMTS 2019 Showfloor Demos

Absolute will showcase B-axis mill-turn centers and multi-slide single-spindle machines, while Marubeni Citizen will demonstrate low-frequency vibration machining.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

With everything that goes on in an exhibitor’s booth at a trade show, it can be difficult for attendees to see live demonstrations of the latest technology. PMTS has scheduled a number of opportunities for attendees to see equipment being demonstrated live in exhibitors’ booths, without other distractions like people asking for quotes, making connections or retrieving basic information on the technology.

On April 3 at 10:30 a.m., Greg Knight, VP of sales at Absolute Machine Tools, and Phillip Judt, applications engineer for Production Turning Points, will give a demo in Absolute’s booth (#3050) called, “When Swiss isn’t the Answer: Game-Changing Turning Platforms.” The presentation will show how parts from multi- and single-spindle screw machines and CNC Swiss-type lathes can be done more efficiently and economically on B-axis mill-turn centers and multi-slide single-spindle machines.

Brian Such, vice president of Marubeni Citizen’s customer support group, will be demonstrating how low-frequency vibration machining can improve part processing and quality, as well as engineered accessories from its R&D technologies group, including the L2000 laser machining and welding system. This presentation will take place April 3 at 11:30 a.m. in booth #6013.

Attend PMTS 2019, April 2-4, at the Huntington Convention Center of Cleveland, Cleveland, Ohio. For more information and to register, go to PMTS.com.

RELATED CONTENT

  • Cut Cycle Times in Half

    Jake Grainger says he always had a mechanical bent, and 38 years ago when he first walked into a screw machine shop he was hooked.

  • A New Breed Of Turn-Mill Center

    The turn-mill center continues to evolve its capabilities. This new machine from Index is an example.

  • The Evolution of the Y Axis on Turn-Mill Machines

    Introduced to the turn-mill machine tool design in about 1996, the Y axis was first used on a single-spindle, mill-turn lathe with a subspindle. The idea of a Y axis on a CNC originated from the quality limitation of polar interpolation and the difficulty in programming, not from electronic advances in controls or servomotor technology as one might commonly think.