1/18/2017

Cutting Tool Composition

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

The performance of a cutting tool in a specific application is strongly influenced by its physical makeup. See what companies are doing to determine what works best for them.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

The performance of a cutting tool in a specific application is strongly influenced by its physical makeup. A carbide cutting tool is manufactured with a mixture of tungsten and cobalt (the binder that holds the ingredients together), with any number of variations in carbide grain size and ratio of carbide to binder. Preferred blends have been developed over time for effectiveness with different cutting depths and widths as well as workpiece materials.

A Formula for Cutting Tool Success” takes a closer look at the engineering behind a high performance cutting tool and examines the process that one cutting tool manufacturer has developed to deliver a tool that maintains a sharp edge and long tool life. The article then provides a look into one customer’s operation that is seeing great savings because of the tooling’s longevity.

For another application story covering a company’s pursuit toward the optimal cutting tool for its application, read “Shop Improves Turning with Indexable Coated Carbide Inserts.” This shop retooled a heavy duty OD turning and facing job for gummy 4130 steel. It tripled the material removal rate and more than doubled tool life after making this change.

Hand holding a crystal ball

We’d rather send you $15 than rely on our crystal ball…

It’s Capital Spending Survey season and the manufacturing industry is counting on you to participate! Odds are that you received our 5-minute Metalworking survey from Production Machining in your mail or email. Fill it out and we’ll email you $15 to exchange for your choice of gift card or charitable donation. Are you in the U.S. and not sure you received the survey? Contact us to access it.

Help us inform the industry and everybody benefits.

RELATED CONTENT

  • Getting the Most Out of Hard Turning

    Traditionally, production of most parts made from hard or hardened materials, defined as those at or more than 45 HRc, required dedicated grinding equipment and processes.

  • Five Process Security Tips When Parting Off

    Here are five rules of thumb from Scott Lewis, a product and application specialist at Sandvik Coromant, to optimize the parting off process, and as a result, maximize tool and insert life. 

  • Making Micro Threads

    Production of micro threads can be challenging, but using the most suitable tools for a given application can simplify the task.

Resources