2/14/2017 | 1 MINUTE READ

Meeting the Challenges of Deep Hole Drilling

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Understanding the challenges of deep hole drilling and knowing how to select and apply the appropriate tools will help a shop profit from this difficult operation.

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A part that requires the drilling of deep holes adds a special layer of complexity to its production process. Deep-hole drilling challenges include the evacuation of chips without damaging the surface finish, delivering coolant to keep the drill and workpiece material cool, and minimizing cycle time, all while maintaining accuracy and repeatability. Understanding the challenges and knowing how to select and apply the appropriate tools will help a shop profit from this difficult operation.

In the article “Tools and Technologies for Deep Hole Drilling,” we provide further detail about what to look for in addressing the typical challenges. This article is based on a presentation by Cory Cetkovic, Sphinx product manager at Kaiser Precision Tooling Inc. He takes an in-depth look at controlling issues such as runout, walking and chips. He then offers strategies for maintaining hole straightness as well as choosing effective drills for specific applications.

For another angle on the topic, check out “Micro-Drilling: Some Questions to Think About.” This article helps to define what exactly is considered micro-drilling, then reviews machine tool and toolholder capabilities, as well as the knowledge level of the machinists, that help meet the requirements of this sometimes tricky operation. Hole depth is a key consideration, but with the right approach, deep hole drilling applications should not be ruled out.

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