5/9/2013 | 1 MINUTE READ

Save Time with Polygon Turning

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Polygon turning provides the capability to manufacture both flat surfaces and radii.

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Polygon turning provides the capability to manufacture both flat surfaces and radii. Schwanog offers polygon turning tools that require no spindle stop, thus providing the potential for considerable time and part cost reductions, versus milling operations, when producing radii.

During the polygon turning operation, the part and tool are turning and require the same conditions as when turning flats. A corresponding driven tool or a tool spindle turns synchronically to the main spindle. The turning direction of the tool and the cutter are then reversed, in comparison to polygon turning of flats, so that the part and the cutter run in the same direction. Because of the higher circumferential speed of the tool, the cutter passes the part, and a radius is established on the turned part.

The size of the radii is mainly dependent on the fly circle diameter, so this diameter must be checked and adapted in design for each application. Radii from 7.5 mm to 20 mm can be produced if the toolholder and fly circle diameter permit it. If two radii, offset by 180 degrees, are to be cut, then considerably larger radii can be produced because the transmission ratio between the tool spindle and the main spindle can be changed from 1 to1 to 2 to 1.

More information about the Schwanog polygon turning tools can be found on the company’s website.

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