3/26/2019

Dormer Pramet Acquires Wetmore

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Wetmore specializes in the supply of precision cutting tools, including handheld skin drilling applications used by several aerospace organizations.

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Wetmore Tool and Engineering of Chino, California, has been acquired by Dormer Pramet, global manufacturer of cutting tool brands Precision Twist Drill, Dormer, Union Butterfield and Pramet.

Founded over 60 years ago, Wetmore specializes in the supply of precision cutting tools, including handheld skin drilling applications used by several aerospace organizations.

The company’s program of high-quality tooling combined with a customer-focused market approach makes the company an excellent fit both strategically and culturally with Dormer Pramet,” says the acquirer.

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