9/8/2010 | 1 MINUTE READ

8-Axis Gang Tool Bar Machine with Subspindle

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Intertech Worldwide’s Model 42-12 LTSS eight-axis CNC gang tool bar machine with 1 5/8" diameter bar capacity features a 10- to 15-hp servo main spindle drive with 4,000-rpm standard, 6,000-rpm optional, a 5- to 7.5-hp servo subspindle drive and Mitsubishi Servo drives for all axis movements.

Intertech Worldwide’s Model 42-12 LTSS eight-axis CNC gang tool bar machine with 1 5/8" diameter bar capacity features a 10- to 15-hp servo main spindle drive with 4,000-rpm standard, 6,000-rpm optional, a 5- to 7.5-hp servo subspindle drive and Mitsubishi Servo drives for all axis movements. The machine has two independent, two-sided tool platens containing six live tools each, three radial and three axial, eight stationary drill holders (4 & 4), nine turning holders (5 & 4), plus a separate cutoff toolholder. The incorporation of the third axis on each platen combined with gang tooling provides a fast, highly productive alternative to standard two-axis gang tool lathes or lathes with turrets, the company says. This design enables the use of 30 tools in a small area minimizing the travel distance from tool to tool. The addition of the Y axis also allows fast and easy tool centerline adjustment through tool offsets, the company says. The main spindle and subspindle are both servo driven with “C” capability and can be programmed for profile synchronization.

The control is a Mitsubishi Model M700 advanced high performance control with a 10 1/2” flat color monitor capable of 12-axis simultaneous interpolation including the two three-axis tool platens, the live tools and the two C-axis spindles.

Programming is accomplished using standard G codes and M functions with all canned cycles featuring “fill in the blank” conversational menus. Programs can be added or retrieved on a CF Card, RS232 and Ethernet. The control has a capacity for as many as 230 programs.

 

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