7/27/2006

Adjustment-Free Rotary Broaching Toolholder

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The adjustment-free rotary broaching toolholder from Slater Tools is designed for Swiss-type machines and allows the operator to use the toolholder without the need for centering. The toolholder uses the standard 1. 25" length rotary broaches, available from stock, which allows for deeper broaching than non-adjustable rotary broaches and toolholders.

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The adjustment-free rotary broaching toolholder from Slater Tools is designed for Swiss-type machines and allows the operator to use the toolholder without the need for centering.

The toolholder uses the standard 1.25" length rotary broaches, available from stock, which allows for deeper broaching than non-adjustable rotary broaches and toolholders. It also is used for any type of CNC Swiss or manual turning, milling, drilling or screw machine.

Rotary broaching, also called hex broaching or wobble broaching, uses a precision tool to produce an internal form inside a pre-drilled hole. The result is a polygon form, which matches the shape of the broach. For instance, a square broach measuring 1/4", produces a square hole of the same size. Broaches are available from the company as squares, hexagons, splines, serrations and other polygon forms. Rotary broaching is a money-saving technique because forms can be created within seconds, according to the company, using the primary machine spindle without having to add secondary machining and operations for production.

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