3/6/2008 | 1 MINUTE READ

Battery-Free Infrared Touch Probe

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For users looking for an alternative to battery operated touch probes for machining applications, Heidenhain Corp. offers the TS 444 infrared touch probe. It can be powered by an alternative energy source in the form of compressed air supplied through the spindle of the machine tool and can be used with all of the company's control systems.

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For users looking for an alternative to battery operated touch probes for machining applications, Heidenhain Corp. offers the TS 444 infrared touch probe. It can be powered by an alternative energy source in the form of compressed air supplied through the spindle of the machine tool and can be used with all of the company's control systems.

To operate the touch probe, compressed air is introduced into the touch probe via the taper shank, and powers a turbine wheel inside the touch probe. The turbine wheel generates electrical energy through changes in the magnetic field, which is stored in high-power capacitors.

With fully charged capacitors, the touch probe is able to probe for 2 minutes. The charging time varies depending upon the pressure: The higher the pressure, the shorter the charging time. A supply pressure of five bars or more is recommended to ensure that charging takes place in a reasonable time. For example, when a pressure of 5.5 bars is used, it takes around 3 seconds to completely charge the touch probe.

Like with the company's conventional touch probes, the exit air is used for cleaning the probing point on this TS 444. This means that at the same time that the touch probe is charged with energy, the probing point is cleaned. The compressed air does not need to be specially cleaned.

Like other touch probes from the company, the TS 444 features an optical sensor technology for generating the trigger signal. The sensor endures a probing accuracy or ± 5 micrometers. 

 

 

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