5/30/2013

Centrifugal System Recycles Fluids for Aqueous Parts Washers

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Sanborn Technologies’ T14-3AQ centrifugal bath purification system features a stainless steel, three-phase centrifuge for separating tramps oils and solids from washer chemicals in aqueous bath solutions.

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Sanborn Technologies’ T14-3AQ centrifugal bath purification system features a stainless steel, three-phase centrifuge for separating tramps oils and solids from washer chemicals in aqueous bath solutions. This centrifugal technology does not deplete bath chemistry during the recycle process and removes a dry solids cake and a separate free oil stream.

The complete system, which is available for wash tanks greater than 1,000 gal, includes a self-priming feed pump, the three-phase centrifuge and an oil reservoir. It is portable and operates automatically, requiring minimal operator attention to maintain a consistently clean bath environment, the company says.
 

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