1/25/2007

Chuck And Bar Turning Centers

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The SR-Series is a heavy-duty chuck and bar turning center that can be configured with many multitasking capabilities to machine complex small to medium-sized parts complete in one setup. With as much as 25 percent more torque and horsepower and 24 percent more speed than previous Hardinge turning centers, the SR 150 and 200 feature heavy-duty linear roller guides mounted to a Harcrete-reinforced cast iron base. Key attributes of the Hardinge SR-Series machines include spindle horsepower of as much as 30 hp and torque of as much as 270 foot pounds; hard turning and hard milling capability; and a control unit with high-speed milling capability and multi-axis functionality.

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The SR-Series is a heavy-duty chuck and bar turning center that can be configured with many multitasking capabilities to machine complex small to medium-sized parts complete in one setup.

With as much as 25 percent more torque and horsepower and 24 percent more speed than previous Hardinge turning centers, the SR 150 and 200 feature heavy-duty linear roller guides mounted to a Harcrete-reinforced cast iron base.

Key attributes of the Hardinge SR-Series machines include spindle horsepower of as much as 30 hp and torque of as much as 270 foot pounds; hard turning and hard milling capability; and a control unit with high-speed milling capability and multi-axis functionality.

 

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