9/11/2007

CNC Lathes For Medical

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Mori Seiki's NL Series of CNC lathes are especially useful for medical manufacturers, particularly those specializing in the production of joint replacement components. Difficult to machine by any standard, these complex parts are usually made of titanium or stainless steel and require extreme accuracy and surface finish. The machine's milling capability allows it to meet the demands of a lean supply chain, according to the company.

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Mori Seiki's NL Series of CNC lathes are especially useful for medical manufacturers, particularly those specializing in the production of joint replacement components. Difficult to machine by any standard, these complex parts are usually made of titanium or stainless steel and require extreme accuracy and surface finish.

The machine's milling capability allows it to meet the demands of a lean supply chain, according to the company. Joint replacement parts are sold in kits that are highly customized to fit specific body types. The flexibility of the NL Series allows manufacturers the agility needed to meet this demand.

The milling motor of the NL Series is located inside the turret, directly coupled to the milling tool. When compared to conventional models, the direct-coupled milling motor reduces tool spindle acceleration time by two-thirds and diminishes vibration and noise by half, the company says. This design also is said to improve accuracy by reducing heat dissipated into the turret to one-tenth of that found in a conventional lathe's milling function.

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