1/30/2019 | 1 MINUTE READ

Drills Designed for Aluminum Automotive Parts

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Sandvik Coromont has added the CoroDrill 400 and CoroDrill 430, developed for drilling aluminum automotive parts, to its range of optimized solid round tools.

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Sandvik Coromant has added the CoroDrill 400 and CoroDrill 430, developed for drilling aluminum automotive parts, to its range of optimized solid round tools. Designed for machining components in medium to large volumes, the drills are said to deliver higher throughput and lower costs as well as extended tool life and enhanced process security.

The drills are supported by CoroTap 100, 200, 300 and 400, which are designed for tapping operations in ISO N materials.

Designed for drilling into solid material, the CoroDrill 400 features more flute volume for better chip evacuation. CoroDrill 430 is designed for drilling into cored material or pre-cast holes, featuring three flutes for increased stability. Both drills include polished flutes and precision coolant holes, with support provided for minimum quantity lubrication (MQL). The drills are available in diameters of 5, 6.8, 7, 8.5, 10.2 and 12.5 mm diameters, which correspond to M6, M8, M10, M12 and M14 thread sizes. Custom options can be designed for other applications.

While both CoroDrill 400 and CoroDrill 430 are available in the Sandvik Coromant N1BU solid carbide grade, the former is also an option in the N1DU veined polycrystalline diamond (PCD) grade. N1DU provides PCD across the entire cutting edge, promoting longer tool life. Due to PCD’s low coefficient of friction and high conductivity of heat, the tool’s cutting edges are said to be less susceptible to built-up edge (BUE).

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