11/6/2013 | 1 MINUTE READ

EvoDeco 32 Single-Spindle Turning Machine Delivers Excellent Output

Originally titled 'Single-Spindle Turning Machine Delivers Excellent Output '
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The Tornos EvoDeco 32 single-spindle turning machine includes ten linear axes, two C axes, four independent tool systems, and a large machining area lit by an LED bulb.

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The Tornos EvoDeco 32 single-spindle turning machine includes ten linear axes, two C axes, four independent tool systems, and a large machining area lit by an LED bulb. Outfitted with powered spindles with synchronous motors, the machines deliver 9.5/12.8 kW output, torque and excellent acceleration/deceleration to significantly reduce cycle times for parts that require a lot of stopping, the company says. The spindle and counterspindle have the same output, in order to facilitate the distribution of tasks between front operations and counter-operations. Continuous temperature stabilization allows inclined milling, complex shapes, ID and OD thread-whirling and more. In differential mode, operators can even perform simultaneous turning and drilling using the guide bush. 

The spindle is the heart of a bar turning machine since it is largely responsible for determining the key elements of machining performance and precision. The EvoDECO is equipped with synchronous spindles. Constant torque enables more substantial turning operations to be performed, with the biggest difference lying in the accelerations and decelerations achieved by the motor. Up to 27 tools, including 21 rotating tools, can be used on the EvoDeco 20 and 32. 

The machine can turn parts up to 32 mm (1-1/4”) diameter, with a max spindle speed of 8,000 rpm; and his little sister, the EvoDeco 20, can accommodate bar up to 1” and a spindle speed of 10,000 rpm. The toolholder system was created with a view to achieving complete versatility and a high level of flexibility with a quick-change system and adapter for presetting tools, the company says. 

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