12/8/2010 | 1 MINUTE READ

Heavy Duty Vertical Turning

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EMCO Maier’s line of heavy-duty vertical turning machines for production, the VT250, designed with integrated automation for complete machining of chucking, cast or forged parts to 200-mm diameter.

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EMCO Maier’s line of heavy-duty vertical turning machines for production, the VT250, designed with integrated automation for complete machining of chucking, cast or forged parts to 200-mm diameter. With its vertical, high-torque, high-power, 25-kW (33.5-hp), 4,000-rpm main spindle, the machine makes turning, drilling and threading operations easy and keeps cycle times brief even in tough material, the company says. The VT250 main spindle torque is a strong 250 Nm. Axis travel is direct-driven 20.9 × 12.2” in X and Z, and ± 3.5” in Y. Maximum workpiece turning diameter is 7.87” and maximum length is 5.91”.

The small-footprint machine, equipped with an integrated pick-up system, self-loads wokrpieces, saving the user the costs and programming time related to external automation.

A conveyor system, which can store as much as 24 workpieces, moves the work into the pick-up position. The tool turret can hold 12 VDI40 tools, each of which can be driven. The machine also has a carrier frame system in which customers can store up to 24 tools. The carrier frame moves the tools into the pick-up position.

There are three versions of the VT 250 from basic to VT250 MY with direct-driven spindle, live tools and Y axis.

Two additional versions of the VT 250 are: VT 250 M (ISM) with driven tools and hollow spindle drive and the VT 250 MY (ISM) with a Y axis on top. Equipped with a hollow spindle drive instead of a belt drive, the two versions perform with a drive power of 29 kW. The VT 250 MY with Y axis offers a travel of 180 mm (± 90 mm).

The basic machine also includes a coolant device and a chip conveyor.

 

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