9/11/2007

High-Precision Orientation Attachment For Davenports

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Davenport's High-Precision Orientation (HPO) attachment has the flexibility to eliminate the need for two of the most commonly used attachments: the 1380-SA Revinloc attachment and MBSL-200-SA 1800 spindle locating attachment (also the MB-2-SL-SA, 360-degree locator). This orientation optional attachment can be used in either the third or fourth position individually or both positions simultaneously. The HPO can be used to produce slots or flats on a part at 90 degrees apart (four tooth), 120 degrees apart (six tooth) and 45 degrees apart (eight tooth).

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Davenport's High-Precision Orientation (HPO) attachment has the flexibility to eliminate the need for two of the most commonly used attachments: the 1380-SA Revinloc attachment and MBSL-200-SA 1800 spindle locating attachment (also the MB-2-SL-SA, 360-degree locator). This orientation optional attachment can be used in either the third or fourth position individually or both positions simultaneously.

The HPO can be used to produce slots or flats on a part at 90 degrees apart (four tooth), 120 degrees apart (six tooth) and 45 degrees apart (eight tooth). This attachment also eliminates a lot of time involved with installing and setting the machine's mechanical components, according to the company. Thus, it reduces setup time by 1 to 2 hours when used in place of the Revinloc attachment and 4 to 6 hours when used in place of the spindle locating attachment.

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