6/12/2018

Max Bar Mini Shank Toolholders Fit Swiss Machines

Originally titled 'Mini Shank Toolholders Fit Swiss Machines'
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Somma’s Max Bar series of mini shank toolholders are designed to fit Swiss machines and can be used for front turning, back turning, cutting off, grooving, and threading, as well as plunge and turn, face grooving, ID grooving, threading and boring.

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Somma’s Max Bar series of mini shank toolholders can be used for many operations including front turning, back turning, cutting off, grooving, and threading plus, plunge and turn, face grooving, ID grooving, threading and boring.

The toolholders are designed to fit Swiss machines. These holders are available with the proper shank sizes and have no need for modifications or large offsets. They are stocked in six series or capacities of holders with a variety of inserts per holder.

Backturning geometries will plunge and turn to depths up to three times the width of the insert. Threading inserts are designed to thread close to and behind shoulders and are precision ground for repeatability. They also have the choices of inserts per holder and have zero radius as standard.

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