12/14/2018 | 1 MINUTE READ

Mill-Turns Enable Six-Sided Complex Machining

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Stama, a member of Chiron Group, has introduced the MT 733 series of vertical-spindle mill-turns for machining a range of complex parts complete in a single work cycle.

Stama, a member of Chiron Group, has introduced the MT 733 series of vertical-spindle mill-turns for machining a range of complex parts complete in a single work cycle. The machining centers are capable of six-sided/simultaneous five-axis machining, including milling and turning from barstock or from chucked parts. The machines are designed to fit the needs of aerospace, automotive and medical parts manufacturers.

Both the one- and two-spindle machine configurations are equally capable of machining a range of materials from aluminum to high-alloy steel bar with diameters ranging to 102 mm and lengths ranging to 1,020 mm. The machines accommodate workpieces as long as 250 mm and chucked parts with diameters ranging to 250 mm. Milling spindle speeds range to 20,000 rpm, turning spindles to 4,200 rpm, spindle acceleration to 1.3 G and rapid traverse speeds to 56 m/min, minimizing cycle times while processing parts complete.

The MT series offers parallel complete machining in two work zones on an MT 733 Two or MT 733 Two Plus for doubled process productivity. The automatic workpiece in feed and output is a standard feature.

The MT 733 is designed with a polymer-concrete base frame in a thermo-symmetric structure with high heat capacity and low heat conductivity. Adaptive software for active milling spindle compensation helps reduce temperature-related variations in the Z axis. The process is aided by cooled linear guides, chip channels and structural components throughout. Notably, the new series includes a B-axis drive unit with zero backlash kinematics and high torsional rigidity, resulting in a robust system with higher accuracy and repeatability, according to the company.

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