1/14/2019

Multi-Spindle Machines Accommodate Both Large and Small Batches

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Schütte’s PC series multi-spindle automatics perform tapping, milling, polygon cutting and eccentric drilling operations.

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Schütte’s PC-series multi-spindle automatics perform tapping, milling, polygon cutting and eccentric drilling operations. The machines feature either six or eight work spindles. The endworking and cross slides can be controlled independently of each other.

The machining centers in the PC series are designed to be used whenever classic cam-controlled automatics reach their limit. The machines can remove material from geometrically sophisticated parts made of hard solid materials. Rear-side machining can apply as many as three tools.

Over 56 CNC axes can be programmed with Schütte’s SICS 2000 system. The automatics are said to produce ready-to-install precision parts in large and small batch sizes, minimizing setup, non-production and part production times.

These machines are used by automobile manufacturers and suppliers in the fittings, pneumatics and hydraulics sectors, as well as in the production of precision parts, according to the company.

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