8/29/2013 | 1 MINUTE READ

Multitasking Turning Center Compresses Lead Times

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Hyundai WIA will display its LM2500TTSY multitasking turning center featuring upper and lower turrets as well as twin spindles for increased productivity.

Hyundai WIA will display its LM2500TTSY multitasking turning center featuring upper and lower turrets as well as twin spindles for increased productivity. The turning center is designed to compress lead times while performing milling and turning operations in a single setup.

The machine’s upper turret uses a wedge-type Y axis to enable machining complex parts in a single chucking. The Y-axis travel is ±50 mm to accommodate a range of workpieces. Spindle specifications for the left and right are 4,000 rpm and 35/20 hp with an A2-8 spindle nose. Each spindle features precision angular bearings for smooth machining with minimal noise and vibration. A spindle chiller helps to control temperature.

The machine features a 45-degree slant-bed design offering a stable platform for precise cutting. All axes are driven by high-precision double-nut ballscrews to prevent thermal growth and increase accuracy. Rapid high speed axis movement is possible due to the linear motion guideways in the Z axis, complemented by box guideways in the X and Y axes for added rigidity. Rapid traverse rates are 24 m/min. (945 ipm) in the X1 and X2 axes, 12 m/min. (472 ipm) in the Y axis, and 24 m/min. (945 ipm) in the Z1 and Z2 axes.

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