Swiss-Type Lathe Enables Easier Guide Bushing Change-Over

IMTS 2018: Absolute Machine Tools is displaying Nexturn’s SA-32PYII Swiss-type lathe, a 32-mm machine with an exchangeable rotary synchronous guide bushing.

Absolute Machine Tools is displaying Nexturn’s SA-32PYII Swiss-type lathe, a 32-mm machine with an exchangeable rotary synchronous guide bushing. This model is said to enable changeover from guide bushing to non-guide bushing operation depending on the application and material. Changing to non-guide bushing mode enables the use of non-ground material and reduces remnant length.

The machine, which uses a FANUC control, features as many as eight total axes (Z1, X1, Y1, Z2, X2, Y2, C1, C2) and accommodates as many as 25 tools. The barstock diameter ranges to 32 mm on the main spindle and subspindle, and the turning length ranges to 210 mm (8") with the guide bushing installed and 60 mm (2.36") without the guide bushing. 

The machine is built for rigidity, accuracy, reliability and ease of us, the company says. The rigid, one-piece cast-iron machine bed has been designed using FEM software. Pre-tensioned ballscrews and LM guides are said to enhance accuracy, and high-speed positioning of 1,260"/min. reduces cycle times.  

The main spindle is a 10-hp, 8,000-rpm built-in motor spindle. The full C axis on both main and subspindles with 0.001-degree position and pneumatic disc-brake clamping are said to increase rigidity for milling operations. A 5-hp, integral motor-synchronous subspindle enables simultaneous front and back working.

Live tools accommodating 3 hp and 6,000 rpm on the cross mill unit and 1.3 hp and 5,000 rpm on the backend face tools are said to enhance drilling and milling ability. ER-16 collets for the live tools are said to ensure  rigidity during cutting. 

IMTS 2018 Exhibitor

Absolute Machine Tools, Inc.

South, Level 3, Booth 338536

View Showroom | Register Here

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