4/15/2018

T-Turn FM Chipbreaker Designed for Steel and Stainless Steel

Originally titled 'Chipbreaker Designed for Steel and Stainless Steel'
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Ingersoll Cutting Tool Co.’s T-Turn FM chipbreaker series is designed especially for steel and stainless steel applications where semi-finish to medium machining is required.

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Ingersoll Cutting Tool Co.’s T-Turn FM chipbreaker is desgined for positive ISO turning inserts and are especially useful for steel and stainless steel applications where semi-finish to medium machining is required.

All inserts within this series feature positive rake face geometry, with a 5-degree angle at the cutting edge and the nose. This design reduces cutting forces during machining, and breaks chips at a range of feed rates and cutting depths, making it a general-purpose solution in these materials.

The chipbreaker inserts are all single-sided and are available in five different shapes and multiple insert sizes, providing the user with a selection of inserts that can be applied in either internal boring or external turning applications.

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