5/15/2001

Thread Rolling Attachment

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The tangential thread rolling attachments feature an easy-to-use pitch diameter adjustment that can be used without any tools. The 360-degree compensator makes it easy to synchronize thread rolls without the need to remove the attachment from the machine. This compact attachment can handle a wide range of thread ran

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The tangential thread rolling attachments feature an easy-to-use pitch diameter adjustment that can be used without any tools. The 360-degree compensator makes it easy to synchronize thread rolls without the need to remove the attachment from the machine. This compact attachment can handle a wide range of thread ranges from 0-80 to 2 1/4 -20, and its thread roils are interchangeable with the company's air-powered radial infeed attachments.
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