2/25/2011 | 1 MINUTE READ

Variety of Lathes, Turning Centers on Display

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

The company will display four Swiss-type lathes and three turning centers.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Related Suppliers

The company will display four Swiss-type lathes and three turning centers. The latest iteration of the Cincom L-series, the L20X, incorporates a Y2 axis on the subspindle side, which enables a variety of extra tooling on both the front and back side of the part. It also enables more overlapping of machining on the front side of the workpiece. The eight-axis, simultaneous machine can accommodate more than 30 tools. 
 
The company will demonstrate bone screw machining on the A20VII, which will employ thread whirling along with 80,000-rpm live spindles, 0.02" end mills and 2,000-psi HP coolant to produce a hexalobe feature. The full-featured Cincom package includes the machine, whirling head, bar feeder, mist collection and HP systems, all of which are supplied and supported by MCC.
 
In addition, a creative machinist tool, the steel tap wrench, will be run on the A32VII and a stainless steel spool will run on the K16EVII.
 
The Miyano ABX-51THY multitasking turning center is equipped with a Fanuc 31i control system, which features a 10.4" full color screen and enhanced user features. With three turrets and three Y-axes, the machine reduces cycle time for complex parts. Live tooling for all stations optimizes balanced milling, and high-rigidity left and right spindles accept heavier cutting conditions. The turrets are designed for stable cutting, whether turning, drilling or milling. The BNA-42SY and BNA-42DHY will also be on display.

Hand holding a crystal ball

We’d rather send you $15 than rely on our crystal ball…

It’s Capital Spending Survey season and the manufacturing industry is counting on you to participate! Odds are that you received our 5-minute Metalworking survey from Production Machining in your mail or email. Fill it out and we’ll email you $15 to exchange for your choice of gift card or charitable donation. Are you in the U.S. and not sure you received the survey? Contact us to access it.

Help us inform the industry and everybody benefits.

RELATED CONTENT

  • The Evolution of the Y Axis on Turn-Mill Machines

    Introduced to the turn-mill machine tool design in about 1996, the Y axis was first used on a single-spindle, mill-turn lathe with a subspindle. The idea of a Y axis on a CNC originated from the quality limitation of polar interpolation and the difficulty in programming, not from electronic advances in controls or servomotor technology as one might commonly think.

  • Cut Cycle Times in Half

    Jake Grainger says he always had a mechanical bent, and 38 years ago when he first walked into a screw machine shop he was hooked.

  • The Upside of Vertical Turning

    Vertical turning centers that use the main spindle to load and unload themselves are finding increasing acceptance as multitasking capabilities make them efficient processing centers for producing chucked parts.

Resources