10/5/2009

Wide Composite Hub Radial Wheel Brushes

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Abtex Corporation has added 2” wide composite hub, radial wheel, fiber abrasive deburring brushes to its line of standard brushes. These additions supplement the company’s 1” and ½” radial wheel brushes.

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Abtex Corporation has added 2” wide composite hub, radial wheel, fiber abrasive deburring brushes to its line of standard brushes. These additions supplement the company’s 1” and ½” radial wheel brushes.

The new, wider brushes are designed for customers who would otherwise have to gang brushes together to finish wider parts in a single pass. Abrasive fibers are embedded, firmly and evenly, around the hub of the virtually indestructible, molded core. This reduces filament breakage and allows the filaments to perform consistently throughout the wear process. The result is higher production rates, longer brush life and less downtime for wheel changes, the company says.

 

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