7/31/2013

Competition and Technology Drive the Pace of Manufacturing

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IMTSTV's Penny Brown recently spoke with Steve Fritzinger, from NetApp, about competition and technology driving the manufacturing industry's pace and why companies must adapt to this change if they want to survive.

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LNS America will be exhibiting new technology at IMTS 2020 in Chicago this September.

Plan to meet up with their team or get registered here!

IMTSTV's Penny Brown recently spoke with Steve Fritzinger, NetApp's virtualization alliance manager, Java author and economics writer, about competition and technology driving the manufacturing industry's pace and why companies must adapt to this change if they want to survive. He cites MTConnect as one of the leading factors for the pace change, and how it has allowed the entire industry to achieve and maintain a greater level of efficiency.

Steve also speaks about the future of manufacturing jobs in America. He offers a solution to student debts and 4-year degrees that provide few benefits. As the industry continues to evolve, Steve predicts that thriving in manufacturing, for both companies and workers, will be based primarily on intellect and innovation.

And for more information about MTConnect and its effects on products in manufacturing, check out Production Machining’s August issue, which features LNS America’s e-Connect system, facilitating data sharing among various manufacturing system components.

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