9/16/2013

Machining Center for Small Workpieces

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Here’s a different approach to a micromachining center--a machining strategy developed around interpolation, allowing machining operations to benefit from the dynamic control of the worktable while reducing the number of tools needed.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Related Suppliers

Here’s a different approach to a micromachining center. At the EMO exhibition in Hannover last week, Willemin-Macodel introduced a machining strategy developed around interpolation, allowing machining operations to benefit from the dynamic control of the worktable while reducing the number of tools needed.

The 701S machining center supports the workpiece on a table that is connected to three arms, similar to an inverted Delta parallel robot. This inverted parallel structure enables the weight in motion to be minimized while ensuring the feed control remains rigid. The result is high natural frequency, highly dynamic control and great reliability in high speed trajectory tracking.

The machining spindle is attached to a fixed gantry overhanging the three-axis table. This concept allows submicron precision in micromachining applications. A balanced spindle shaft with no floating mechanical parts results in top quality rotation.

To see an in-depth description of this interesting micromachining center concept, read “Purpose Built Micromachining Center” from Production Machining’s upcoming October issue.

RELATED CONTENT

  • Pigging Out: High Feed Machining Techniques For Small Cutters

         Small machining applications—those relying upon tool diameters smaller than 2. 0 mm—are continuing to grow based upon both consumer demand and developing machining technology. It’s apparent that the trend to produce ever-tinier electronic goods will continue (smaller cell phones, minute keyboards, plastic ear buds, and so on); all require small and precise mold insert creation.

  • Micro Deburring Gets Hot

    “Micro deburring,” a name commonly used to describe the deburring of tiny small parts, is often considered more of an art than a science. Although this is true to some extent, deburring micro parts does not always have to require hand manicuring parts with a scalpel under 10× to 20× magnification.

  • High Speed Spindles For Swiss Machining

    This article dicusses the use of high-speed spindles in Swiss machining applications. Sufficient rotational speed is necessary to take advantage of tooling materials in small diameter cutters.

Resources