12/8/2017

Five-Axis Rotary Table for Small VMCs

Originally titled 'Rotary Table TAP is for Small VMCs'
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Exsys Tool Inc.’s five-axis rotary table TAP is for small, high-speed vertical machining centers and allows users to upgrade a vertical machining center to increase productivity without incurring the expense of a new machine.

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EXSYS Tool will be exhibiting new technology at IMTS 2020 in Chicago this September.

Plan to meet up with their team or get registered here!

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Exsys Tool Inc.’s five-axis rotary table TAP is for small, high-speed vertical machining centers. The table TAP allows users to upgrade a vertical machining center to increase productivity without incurring the expense of a new machine, the company says.

The TAP creates a five-axis machining center for small- and medium-sized workpieces up to a cube of approximately 5.9” (150 mm). It can be used by automotive suppliers as well as the medical device, watch/clock and precision mechanical parts industries, and contract manufacturing.

The TAP expands the pL Lehmann 500 series of modular multi-axis rotary tables from four basic models to five. According to the company, the 500 series tables can be assembled into as many as 240 different configurations with more than 20 different clamping methods and behind-the-spindle accessories that include rotary unions, special clamping cylinders and angular position measuring systems further extend the system’s adaptability.

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