4/2/2019

Index G420 Turn-Mill Center Provides Single Setup Machining

Originally titled 'Turn-Mill Center Provides Single Setup Machining'
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Index G420’s stability and response are said to make it a good choice when completing large, complex parts in a single setup. 

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Index’s G420 turn-mill center features 3,500 rpm twin spindles with 315 mm (400 mm is also available) chucks and a five-axis milling spindle that provides as much as 12,000 rpm with an HSK-T63 interface or 18,000 rpm with a Capto C6 interface. The machine’s stability and response are said to make it a good choice when working with difficult-to-machine materials, providing value to aerospace manufacturers completing large, complex parts in a single setup, according to the company. 

The machine’s large work area provides space for parts with a length of as much as 1,600-mm and is designed to optimize accessibility. Additionally, an optional workpiece handling system can be incorporated for loading, unloading and transferring parts as large as 20 kg and 120 mm. Designed as a modular system, the machine is said to accommodate as many as three tool carriers in its workspace, each equipped with a Y-axis. Turret steady rests are available to ensure stability when machining long or shaft-shaped parts.

According to the company, all relevant components on the machine are easily accessible to operating and maintenance personnel. A chip conveyor can be mounted to either side of the machine. Furthermore, automation solutions, including conveyor belts and robot handling units, can be integrated to provide additional enhancements to productivity.

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