1/18/2017 | 1 MINUTE READ

Y Axis Offers Flexibility for Multitasking Operations

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The Y axis has capabilities that make processes efficient and cost effective, and it supports many tools that enable a range of operations.

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For a shop that does turning and milling operations and is looking to reduce the cost per piece, using a Y axis is a solid option. The Y axis has capabilities that make processes efficient and cost effective, and it supports many tools that enable a range of operations. The Y axis provides control over the size of a feature because it enables programming and adjusting the tool position, resulting in an accurate feature size.

Also, pocket milling a rectangular or square feature can be achieved, and deburring processes can be performed with a Y axis. On the latest multitasking turning centers, a Y axis may be available on both the upper and lower turret, enabling pinch milling for more efficient operations. Having the ability to use the Y axis simultaneously on both spindles can reduce cycle times and increase quality.

The Y axis allows for helical interpolation, which requires simultaneous motion in multiple axes—X, Y and Z is possible. This three-axis profiling can be used for thread milling, for making holes and for creating circular ramping. The Y axis also eliminates the need for many secondary operations, and it optimizes processes when doing off-center features on a part.

For more information about benefits of the Y axis and what it is, read “The Y of Multitasking.” Also, read “The Evolution of the Y Axis on Turn-Mill Machines.” 

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