7/20/2016

Multitasking Encourages Successful Manufacturing

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While multitasking allows a shop to perform various manufacturing operations unattended, without moving the part to other machines and refixturing, it also helps shops explore better ways to manufacture. The advantages of multitasking make manufacturing more efficient for any shop.

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While multitasking allows a shop to perform various manufacturing operations unattended, without moving the part to other machines and refixturing, it also helps shops explore better ways to manufacture.

Once a shop implements multitasking, the benefits are plentiful and include producing more accurate, higher quality parts at tighter tolerances. Human error is not present in multitasking, and fixturing errors are non-existent as well, since operators do not have to refixture a part coming from another machine. Multitasking saves time, reduces part cost and floor space, increases throughput, offers improved machine monitoring, and more.

All of these advantages of multitasking make manufacturing more efficient for any shop.

To learn more about this process and to read some success stories, read “Multitasking is More Than Doing Two Things at Once,” “Machining Complex Workpieces Complete,” “Multitasking Helps Detroit Shop,” and “Multitasking Machine Produces Unique Medical Part.”

 

 

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