5/24/2019 | 2 MINUTE READ

Craftsman's Cribsheet No. 77: Top OSHA Violations for 2019

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Here is a list of the 10 most common violations in our shops this year, according to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

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Here is a list of the 10 most common violations in our shops this year, according to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

  1. Fall Protection (1926.501). The employer shall determine if the walking/working surfaces on which its employees are to work have the strength and structural integrity to support employees safely. Employees shall be allowed to work on those surfaces only when the surfaces have the requisite strength and structural integrity.
  2. Hazard Communication (1910.1200). The purpose of this section is to ensure that the hazards of all chemicals produced or imported are classified, and that information concerning the classified hazards is transmitted to employers and employees.
  3. Scaffolding - General Requirements (1926.451). Except as provided in paragraphs (a)(2), (a)(3), (a)(4), (a)(5) and (g) of this section, each scaffold and scaffold component shall be capable of supporting, without failure, its own weight and at least four times the maximum intended load applied or transmitted to it.
  4. Respiratory Protection (1910.134). A respirator shall be provided to each employee when such equipment is necessary to protect the health of such employee. The employer shall provide the respirators, which are applicable and suitable for the purpose intended. The employer shall be responsible for the establishment and maintenance of a respiratory protection program.
  5. Control of Hazardous Energy - Lockout/Tagout (1910.147). This standard covers the servicing and maintenance of machines and equipment in which the unexpected energization or start up of the machines or equipment, or release of stored energy, could harm employees. This standard establishes minimum performance requirements for the control of such hazardous energy.
  6. Ladders (1926.1053). Ladders shall be capable of supporting the following loads without failure.
  7. Powered Industrial Trucks (1910.178). This section contains safety requirements relating to fire protection, design, maintenance and use of fork trucks, tractors, platform lift trucks, motorized hand trucks and other specialized industrial trucks powered by electric motors or internal combustion engines.
  8. Fall Protection - Training Requirements (1926.503). The employer shall provide a training program for each employee who might be exposed to fall hazards. The program shall enable each employee to recognize the hazards of falling and shall train each employee in the procedures to be followed in order to minimize these hazards.
  9. Machine Guarding - General Requirement (1910.212). One or more methods of machine guarding shall be provided to protect the operator and other employees in the machine area from hazards such as those created by point of operation, ingoing nip points, rotating parts, flying chips and sparks.
  10. Personal Protective and Lifesaving Equipment - Eye and Face Protection (1926.102). The employer shall ensure that each affected employee uses appropriate eye or face protection when exposed to eye or face hazards from flying particles, molten metal, liquid chemicals, acids or caustic liquids, chemical gases or vapors or potentially injurious light radiation.

All Craftsman’s Cribsheets are available for viewing and download at short.productionmachining.com/cribsheets.


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