10/11/2018

Digital Force Gages Perform Basic, Automatic Testing

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Starrett's DFC and DFG digital force gages can be used both as hand-held gages or mounted on testing stands. 

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

The Starrett Co. introduces its DFC and DFG series of digital hand-held force gages. Depending on the series, automatic testing can be attained with the DFC force gage controlling the company’s FMM digital force tester, or basic testing can be performed using the DFG gage.

The gages feature a high-resolution OLED color backlit display and auto-off function. A primary and secondary window shows test results, and out-of-tolerance results display in red. A multi-function keypad has softkeys that are programmable to the users’ most repetitive functions.

Adjustable sampling rates help capture peak loads, and users can apply filters to peak and display values. The battery life is said to provide more than 30 hours of continuous operation. The gages also have a USB port for transmitting data to a computer, a cast aluminum housing with a comfortable grip design for handheld testing, and a metric threaded top post that enables screw-on attachments and clevis adapters to fit hundreds of test fixtures.

RELATED CONTENT

  • How to Choose and Use Styli

    The variety of probe applications on machine tools, CMMs, comparative gages and portable arms makes correct selection of styli usage essential for efficient, reliable and accurate measurement. Here are some key points that can be helpful in choosing the best measurement solution.

  • Reducing Downtime With Tool Presetting

    It’s an ongoing challenge. To remain competitive, shops must find new and more efficient ways to increase production. Often they look to new, faster and more precise machine tools as the answer. Sometimes experimentation with a variety of different tooling

  • Attain Consistent Roundness and Concentricity Readings

    The CNC Swiss-type lathe is finding an increasingly large market as non-traditional Swiss shops find its production advantages for small, precise and complex workpieces.

Resources