4/1/2018

Puma SMX Series Adds Lower Turret for Increased Versatility

Originally titled 'Multitasking Turning Center Series Adds Lower Turret '
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Doosan Machine Tools’ Puma SMX super multitasking turning centers are built for completing complex parts in a single setup.

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Doosan Machine Tools’ Puma SMX super multitasking turning centers have a lower turret for enhanced versatility and productivity. The series is a twin-spindle, multitasking turning center built for completing complex parts in a single setup.

Both turning spindles feature 0.0001-degree resolution on the C axis for high-precision contouring, and the 12,000-rpm dedicated milling spindle features a 0.0001-degree resolution contouring B axis as well. With a Y-axis stroke of 11.8” (300 mm) and an orthogonal X/Y structure, part accuracy and machine accessibility are both improved.

The addition of a lower turret allows operators to be even more productive on a single CNC machine. A 12-station static tool turret is standard on SMX ST models, and a 5,000-rpm milling turret is available as an option. The turret is also designed to accommodate steady rests, follow rests, tailstock centers and two-jaw vises.

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