5/8/2020 | 1 MINUTE READ

Romi’s D Series Vertical Machining Centers Built for Rigidity and Speed

Originally titled 'Thermal Compensation Helps Provide VMC Machining Accuracy'
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These VMCs absorb vibration to allow consistent production of highly precise parts.

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Romi’s D Series vertical machining centers (VMCs) are designed and built, based on customer research, to offer users higher productivity, robustness and precision. The VMCs are built with Romi-made monoblock cast iron beds that absorb vibration to allow consistent production of highly precise parts. In the United States, Romi offers three models — the D 800, D 1000 and D 1250. All three are equipped with big-bore, 40-taper, direct-drive spindles with speeds of 10,000 or 15,000 rpm. A direct-drive system is said to be low maintenance and improves accuracy and repeatability, while the big-bore 40-taper increases stiffness and allows increased depth of cut.

The machines are equipped with thermal compensation (with sensors) to improve precision. Each model features a FANUC 0i-MF i-HMI CNC with 15" touchscreen, and a high-speed package that is said to allow better performance during machining. Linear roller guides on all three models facilitate feed rates up to 1,575 ipm (40 m/min), which allows for precise, fast acceleration and positioning. These guides are also said to increase robustness during machining and higher load capacity (part weight) on the table.

The models D 800, D 1000 and D 1250 have a net machine weight of 20,500 lbs., 21,800 lbs. and 23,000 lbs., respectively; and a maximum machining volume of 31 × 24 × 25 inches, 40 × 24 × 25 inches and 50 × 24 × 25 inches, respectively. Each model is also equipped with a 30-tool automatic vertical tool changer.

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