6/5/2013

Mazak Event Targets Aerospace, Medical

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While in the area for EASTEC last month, I attended Mazak Corporation’s “Discover More with Mazak” event at its Northeast Technology Center in Windsor Locks, Conn. The 3-day event highlighted a lineup of the company’s manufacturing systems.

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While in the area for EASTEC last month, I attended Mazak Corporation’s “Discover More with Mazak” event at its Northeast Technology Center in Windsor Locks, Conn. The 3-day event highlighted a lineup of the company’s manufacturing systems designed to meet the ever expanding production needs of the area’s aerospace, medical and other manufacturing sectors.

The machine tool demonstrations included three new machines—the Variaxis i-700, the Variaxis i-800, and the Vertical Center Universal 400. Other machines at the event included the Integrex i-630V (for heavy-duty 5-axis cutting), the Integrex i-200S (with twin turning spindles and a milling spindle), and the Megaturn Nexus 900M (combining turning and secondary machining operations for large cast iron and steel workpieces). Other demonstrations addressed real-world applications, including aerospace hard-metal machining on a horizontal Nexus 6800 HM (hard metal package) and medical implant machining on a vertical Nexus Compact.

The event also included several technology presentations and expert guests that provided attendees with valuable manufacturing insight. On Wednesday, May 15, keynote speaker Richard Aboulafia, of the Teal Group (a company that supplies independent aerospace and defense industry market analysis), shared his knowledge of the aviation and aerospace industries and spoke about the commercial airline industry.

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