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Putting your Shop on a Diet: How to Become Lean

There are strategies involved in achieving lean for a shop, but like going on a diet, lean doesn’t happen overnight and it takes some work on your part to get your shop in shape.
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 Keeping inspection close to machining prevents quality from becoming a bottleneck.

There are strategies involved in achieving lean for a shop, but like going on a diet, lean doesn’t happen overnight and it takes some work on your part to get your shop in shape. In "Tips to Lean on for Becoming Lean," I’ve compiled some tips on how to turn a shop lean, and I’ve included links to several articles PM has written, so you can read more about it.

The steps may involve reorganizing your equipment into machining cells, understanding customer needs, cross-training employees, upgrading technology—all ideas based on creating a successful manufacturing business for a long time to come. Read more here

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