5/25/2016 | 1 MINUTE READ

Reasons to Consider Thread Milling

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Read about how thread milling can make your shop's processes more efficient, as well as several requirements for thread milling that should be considered.

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Traditionally, thread milling has been used on large workpieces and tapping has been used primarily to make threads in small holes. However, solid carbide thread mills are now manufactured to produce threaded holes as small as 0.25 inch, and better programming software makes the use of thread milling more widespread.

According to “When Thread Milling Makes Sense,” there are many reasons to consider performing thread milling that can make your shop’s processes more efficient. First, thread milling achieves a better quality thread than tapping. Second, thread mills are able to machine complete threads close to the bottom of a blind hole because the bottoms of these tools are flat. Also, thread milling is easier on the machine tool, and right- or left-handed threads can be produced using the same tooling. These are only some of the benefits of thread milling small parts.

That being said, there are several requirements for thread milling that are important to be aware of before moving forward. First, thread milling needs to be done on CNC machines with at least three axes for helical interpolation. Second, the machine operator must be able to write and understand the necessary computer program for thread milling. Also, to prevent tool deflection, it’s important to keep an eye on the length-to-diameter ratio and tool overhang.

To read about more advantages of thread milling small parts and to watch a video, visit “Thread Milling on a Tiny Scale.”

 

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