10/28/2013 | 1 MINUTE READ

Video: Company Evolves from a Manual Shop to a High Precision Success Story

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Ian and Jack Wagter, owners of Lumar Machining & Manufacturing Ltd. of St. Thomas, Ontario, Canada, purchased the company with a customer base of two automotive plants. Today, Lumar Machining has a thriving business with plans to expand, adding even more machining technology.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Related Suppliers

Ian and Jack Wagter, owners of Lumar Machining & Manufacturing Ltd. of St. Thomas, Ontario, Canada, purchased the company with a customer base of two automotive plants. Today, Lumar Machining has a thriving business with plans to expand, adding even more machining technology.

When Ian and Jack came across Lumar, the most sophisticated piece of technology was a fax machine. Ian recognized the company’s potential and capitalized on its established employee base. After riding out a learning curve, Ian made the transition from process engineering in large plants to taking on a general machine shop.

 

bar chart showing improvement

With the recession that followed 9/11, everything was cut to a minimum. Despite maintaining lean operations, the owners took a leap of faith and purchased more CNC machines during the economic downturn. Because of their ability to look forward while others hunkered down, they were able to take advantage of great deals in the marketplace.

With new technology and a newly trained workforce, eventually Ian and Jack’s staff gained a foothold serving high precision customers in several new markets, while still retaining their two original automotive customers.

To see a video of the whole story, visit Tell Us Your Okuma Story at okuma.com. Here, you too can submit a video or written entry discussing your success using Okuma machine tools. 

 

RELATED CONTENT

  • Endworking Enhances Shaft Manufacturing Process

    Because endworking is often considered only as a preliminary step for shaft work typical of the automotive industry, potential productivity gains are being passed by. Newer technology has enabled these machines to handle far more applications.

  • Are Bar Fed Machining Centers the Next Big Thing?

    Advanced mill-turn machines with bar fed material handling can overcome several inherent weaknesses of production machining on vertical machining centers.

  • Tooling Up For Hard Turning

    Hard turning isn’t hard to do. However, it does require an understanding of the process dynamics and a systematic approach to the tooling involved. This article looks at how proper preparation will deliver consistent, predictable hard-turning results.


Resources